Anubis Gate

Anubis Gate Inhaltsverzeichnis

Anubis Gate ist eine dänische Progressive- und Power-Metal-Band aus Aalborg, die im Jahr gegründet wurde. Anubis Gate ist eine dänische Progressive- und Power-Metal-Band aus Aalborg, die im Jahr gegründet wurde. Inhaltsverzeichnis. 1 Geschichte; 2 Stil. Mit Anubis Gate bekommt die sonst im internationalen Vergleich eher unterrepräsentierte dänische Szene Zuwachs. Obwohl erst gegründet, hat man es. Entdecken Sie Veröffentlichungen von Anubis Gate auf Discogs. Kaufen Sie Platten, CDs und mehr von Anubis Gate auf dem Discogs-Marktplatz. Im Prinzip könnte ich zu "Anubis Gate", dem selbstbetitelten Viertalbum dieser Band aus dem dänischen Aalborg, den gleichen Einleitungstext.

Anubis Gate

Entdecken Sie Veröffentlichungen von Anubis Gate auf Discogs. Kaufen Sie Platten, CDs und mehr von Anubis Gate auf dem Discogs-Marktplatz. Hallo zusammen, ich bin zufällig beim stöbern im Netz auf diese Band gestossen und sie haben mich umgehauen. Anubis Gate spielen progressiven Metal mit. BIOGRAPHY The Anubis Gate biography - from the early beginning till now. THE OLD DAYS: In Jesper M. Jensen (bass) and Henrik Fevre (guitar, vocals).

Anubis Gate - Anubis Gate – Covered In Black

Schmidt M. Mehr Informationen finden sich in unserer Datenschutzerklärung. Straske T. Was mich nicht davon abhält, mich hier von Zeit zu Zeit schwerpunktmässig zu Progmetal- und Retroprog-Acts und -Outputs zu äussern. Fassen wir es daher noch mal kurz zusammen: Um herum wurden Anubis Gate hauptsächlich als zeitgenössische Power-Metal-Kapelle wahrgenommen und sind mit dem Abflauen des Interesses an dieser Musikrichtung - offenbar ein unumgängliches Schicksal jedes Trend-Stiles - trotz fortwährender Aktivität in Vergessenheit geraten. Anubis Gate Here returns to London, where the last magician, Romanelli, kidnaps him, Jacky, and Coleridge. Tim Powers must be some kind of a freakin' genius! More filters. Then it started to pick up and I found I really started to enjoy things once we met Jacky and that lot. Error rating book. Next up was a bit different from the pack. Get A Copy. Anubis Gate is a progressive metal band from Denmark.

Despite having formed Anubis Gate only in , the members have regularly worked together since The band released their first album in , but their history can be traced back to , with bassist Jesper M.

Jensen and Henrik Fevre as guitarist and vocalist forming V-Axe. The group changed its name to Graff Spee, and the line-up was completed with drummer Per M.

Gaining some reputation in the local circles, Graff Spee released a few demos, but eventually split up in "due to creative differences".

In both Jesper and Per moved to Esbjerg to join Jacob Hansen's Invocator , releasing a couple of demos and also a full-length album Excursion Demise in , before Jesper split and moved back to Aalborg.

These two musicians kept in contact however and began to write new material together in a melodic power metal style. After releasing an instrumental demo under the name of Seven Powers one more band member was recruited; Torben Askholm previously in Prophets Of Doom and Northern Empire joined as vocalist and the recording of a demo which eventually became the backbone of their debut album began.

Thus Purification was produced during and released April 26, The album aroused a great deal of interest and delight with the press and the audience, and soon both Kim Olesen and Henrik Fevre who had guested on the debut as both writers and musicians were made permanent members to solidify the line-up for the next album.

A Perfect Forever was released on September 19, Few months before the band's first gig at Prog Power Europe Askholm quit the band, and Fevre took over vocal duties for a couple of gigs.

Eventually Jacob Hansen, the old friend from Invocator and also producer of the first two albums was chosen as the new singer, and the third album Andromeda Unchained came out August 14, It was nominated for best production, best album and best artwork at Danish Metal Awards and won the latter.

The year saw Anubis Gate writing their most ambitious work, the concept album The Detached upon a synopsis by Martin Rauff. It was released March 30, and also nominated for three Danish Metal Awards Best album, Best cover artwork and best production at the show of Several other companies showed interest as the band in embarked on writing material for their fifth album, which was scheduled for release in the fall of In fact most of the songs were already finished when Jacob Hansen announced his surprising departure from the band.

Luckily Anubis Gate had a replacement within the band; bass player Henrik Fevre, who did backing vocals and the occasional lead on recent albums.

Demos of the new material, produced by Kim Olesen secured the band a record deal in March with Minnesota-based Nightmare Records.

The self-titled album was released September 13, and for the first time in the band's history it was accompanied by a single and a video for Golden days.

Anubis Gate concerts have always been rare. But saw the band returning to Prog Power Europe, this time as co-headliners. It also marked the departure of founding member Jesper M.

Jensen, who was replaced by Michael Bodin Third Eye. The first sounds of the new 4-piece were revealed on October 31, when the minute download EP Sheep was given to the public for free.

Misters Broken Wings. It also marked the band's 10 years anniversary as a recording artist. Anubis Gate was engaged to perform their first US gig on September 11, at the Prog Power Festival in Atlanta, but had to cancel due to health problems within the band.

In September , the band released a limited box set called Orbits , containing the long out of print first four albums plus a double rarities bonus disc.

This box set was funded via fans on Kickstarter in April Their seventh album Covered In Black was released September 1, The album was darker and more dissonant than usual inspired by the same health problems that cancelled Prog power Anubis Gate is a progressive metal band that bends the rules a bit.

They don't resemble Dream Theater to my ears, and they don't succumb to showboating or endless riffing. Instead, Anubis Gate aims for something higher than what's been done in the past.

The band has a unique sound, one that deserves more attention and that would certainly thrill many metalheads, as well as prog rock fans, too.

Their sound revolves around layers of sound, of which metal is only a part. You see, on "Horizons", the band has created an album of superior dark guitars, incredible drumming and bass, beautiful keys, and powerful vocals that combine to create slick melodies, piercing electronic tones, technical expertise, and maturity beyond their years.

If I had to make comparisons, I would call this new album a cross between Circus Maximus and Subsignal.

You see, the band mixes a big helping of pop into their sound, and achieves a similar sound to these two bands in that they write infectious melodies that contrast nicely to the virtuosity on display.

You read that correctlythis metal band utilizes pop quite a bit. It's in their catchy choruses, their harmonies, and their general attitude on certain songs.

That is not to say that "Horizons" is devoid of metal, though. Anubis Gate has a fresh sound to their riffing, and the structure, not the technicality, seems more calculating.

They seem to set out with a certain idea in mind, and they pull it off flawlessly, without ever becoming pretentious.

The band leans, not on metallic instrumentals, but upon genuine melodies and superior songwriting. Indeed, one of the first things I noticed on "Horizons" was the incredibly catchy songs.

And, yet, the structures are even more impressive, such as on my favorite track, "Dream Within a Dream". This longer track mixes a catchy chorus in the first half with an ethereal, almost psychedelic interlude that leads into some fantastic metal.

You see, the band masterfully combines all their elements to the point where it all feels so organic and inspired. Other tracks are equally impressive.

And on and on the album goes, each song being fully enjoyable and supremely composed. Never overbearing, and always interesting, unlike much prog metal today.

Other favorites include "Airways" and "Breach of Faith". They have crafted a balanced album full of truly interesting riffs, mesmerizing electronics, and catchy melodies.

It's a wonderful combination that uses all the tools in the toolbox without ever using any of them as a crutch. From progheads to metalheads, I feel this album will appeal to everyone.

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Per M. In the band split up,with Henrik leaving due to creative differences. In the following years Per and Jesper will form and dissolve many bands of varying musical genres and styles.

Hitting the studio in after writing enough material for a full length album,ANUBIS GATE recorded "Purification",a loosely based concept album about fighting inner demons and psychological cleansing.

Former members Kim Oleson and Henrik Fevre guests on the album,contributing guitar,keyboards and harmony vocals respectively. The album was very well received and Kim Oleson guitar and Henrik Fevre bass,backing vocals were brought on board permanently.

Disc 1 1. Rindfrey C. Juli Krosse K. Henrik Fevre. Egbers W. Anspieltipp s :. Hirle A.

Anubis Gate Video

Powers put a lot of consideration into the lives portrayed here, and while Doyle was hard to truly love, he grew on me as he grew as a character.

I really liked him by the end. There are many twists and turns to the story, and the plot is both intricate and complex.

The novel is in third-persion limited omniscience, which allows for a great deal of variety, while sacrificing the immediacy and the feeling of being in the character's skin.

I almost wish it was written in first-person, because the sheer amount of detail and description in London was astounding and beautiful in the horrible way those grubby English types can be, and feeling what he felt would have been an extraordinary treat.

This is no urban fantasy novel. The magic was strange and had some very curious aspects to it, and pitting a magical viewpoint with a time-traveler in a closed-loop system felt like a stroke a of genius.

I have to say that the novel, while sometimes slow, was well thought-out and complex. I think it succeeded as a traditional fantasy novel, a traditional science-fiction novel, and also as a traditional horror novel in equal parts.

I may be jaded by modern fiction that throws together whichever genres you like to make a goulash that's tasty and strange, or even some science fiction or fantasy that simply draws from the tradition of horror.

This novel balances all three and even spares a tithe to mystery, romance, action-adventure, social-commentary a-la Dickens, and poetry.

The fact that Mr. Powers pulls it all off is a testament to skill as a writer. View all 20 comments.

Sep 10, Phrynne rated it it was amazing. This book was just so much fun! It was really, really entertaining and I have no problem giving it five stars.

Basically it is a story about time travel. It reminded me a lot of the Doomsday Book by Connie Willis which is one of the best books I have ever read so I mean this as praise indeed.

The method of travelling is very original and the purpose very devious. Having travelled our hero spends a large part of the book living in the past and often suffering accordingly.

We meet Coleridge and Lor This book was just so much fun! We meet Coleridge and Lord Byron and travel geographically as well as time wise.

Magic comes into play but it is a very flawed magic and does not always behave as it should. Occasionally I must admit it all got too smart for me and I got a bit lost as to who was who.

Did I mention there was some body swapping going on as well? In the end I decided just to go along for the ride and enjoy myself and eventually it all fell into place.

There was a masterpiece of an ending which tied up all the loose ends and I sat back and asked myself what else this guy has written because boy is he good!

View all 5 comments. May 20, carol. Two and a half stars for me by the GR system; 'okay' verging on 'I liked it.

Ultimately, I can see where others liked it, but it's not executed in way I enjoyed. In some ways, it reminds me of Connie Willis' To Say Nothing of the Dog in that while there is some time traveling, there is very little of technological surprise, and most of it takes place within Victorian England.

In similar fashion to TSNotD, a historian accidentally gets left behind; in this case, he is kidnapped shortly after his time-traveling group goes to England to hear Coleridge speak.

The magic system isn't well explained, but involves some Egyptian spirit theory and some earth magic, and perhaps the most interesting developments of the book are when these devices are employed or executed.

The fact that it isn't well explained, however, contributes to the choppiness of the overall story. The plot was interesting, and Powers develops a number of characters that grew on me, but the execution was rough and choppy.

A body-switching spirit comes into play, and by the second half of the book, at points we only know there has been a switch by a death scene and new names coming into play.

It becomes distracting and confusing to know who is important to plot and character development, as body switches and secondary characters enter and are quickly dropped.

When the main character, Doyle, first escapes from his kidnappers, we quickly go through a score of characters, and neither he, nor us, apparently, are supposed to look back.

Frequent references to poets like Byron and Coleridge, and the general Victorian setting--a period which I normally avoid-- and it only adds to the confusion.

The initial scene probably started me out with a number of wrong assumptions, as it created some sympathy for the both the main antagonist and his boss, but it was sympathy that would never be recaptured through the course of the story.

View all 9 comments. Jan 13, Jokoloyo rated it it was amazing. I had a real life experience that comparable with the critical moment of the main protagonist.

It works like magic. Three hours after I ate carbon, I vomited a lot. Five minutes after that, I feel good again. I was still innocent literally.

So, I had many "Wow! Then I re-read this novel as a group reading. I could still remember some of the pleasure and exciting parts.

Although as a more experienced reader, I could see that the characterization of this book is mediocre at best.

But, I forgive the characterization because it is not the strength of this novel. The main strong selling point of this novel is successfully blending the temporal paradox of time travel with the thrilling plots.

I cannot praise enough how the author is playing with temporal paradox idea so well and keep the story exciting. View all 6 comments.

Apr 10, Penny rated it really liked it Shelves: scifi-fantasy-clubchallenge , science-fiction , fantasy , scifi-and-fantasy-club-bookshelf , time-travel , locus-nominee , award-winner.

My main feeling during the book was that it was weird. Not bad weird, not necessarily good weird, just a bit odd.

I found it took a while to get into, I was never bored, but I also wasn't really all that interested for a large portion of the beginning of this one.

Then it started to pick up and I found I really started to enjoy things once we met Jacky and that lot.

There were a lot of interesting ideas, strange characters and weird happenings in this novel. I enjoyed it, but I'm sure I don't un My main feeling during the book was that it was weird.

I enjoyed it, but I'm sure I don't understand half of it. Although a few of the motivations were very clear, most really weren't.

I know what they were trying to achieve but I still don't know why. I'm not sure it really matters.

It was a fun read anyway. Strange, but fun. A time travel novel featuring sorcery, evil clowns, Ancient Egyptian Gods, body switching, a condensed version of Dante, literary scholars, cross dressing, fencing champions, dog-faced men and Romantic poets.

That opening sentence lost it's short, pithy, catchphrase-like nature somewhere along the way.

Mirroring the novel in that way infact. An American Coleridge expert gets invited on a time travel adventure to hear said poet speak only to find himself trapped in the early 19th century London, a A time travel novel featuring sorcery, evil clowns, Ancient Egyptian Gods, body switching, a condensed version of Dante, literary scholars, cross dressing, fencing champions, dog-faced men and Romantic poets.

An American Coleridge expert gets invited on a time travel adventure to hear said poet speak only to find himself trapped in the early 19th century London, adventure and skulduggery ensue.

There's so much plot that even Powers doesn't know what to do with it half of the time and after the first two thirds he was either forced to drastically cut whole swathes of storyline or he really liked the idea of a nonstop series of action sequences which repeatedly puts the protagonist in peril with very little linkage between each one.

Prior to this point it was an exciting adventure story, peopled by intriguing characters and entertaining passages of action, if not quite fully evoking the time and place at least giving enough detail to make certain that you're not in s America, the time travel element is dealt with very well and isn't foregrounded to the extent that you're always aware of it and puzzling over it but really this should have been multiple books or at the very least a page novel.

I found myself sucked in to the story by Powers way with words, more reminiscent of the golden period of science fiction than contemporary fantasy novelists and what starts as a pretty typical time travel idea becomes so much more so quickly that you barely have time to draw breath.

It's constructed so cleverly and entertains to thoroughly that the switch two thirds of the way through isn't the disaster it might have been in a lesser novel, yes in essence you're dragged over the finish line in a river of blood but he got you there and he entertained you en route.

At no point did I even consider giving up early and going home. All in all a great read that I wouldn't hesitate to recommend to anyone open to a time travel fantasy.

Jul 09, Wanda rated it liked it Shelves: reading-project , egypt , time-travel , read-in , speculative-fiction. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. There are aspects that I love, some that leave me confused, and at least one that produced both sensations.

One of the confusing aspects of the book for me was the role of the Gypsies. Also, at least one of the characters, Dog-Faced Joe, has the ability to switch bodies.

What was both wonderful and confusing was the poetry of Ashbless. While waiting in an inn for Ashbless to show up, he writes out a poem from memory.

At that point, I realized that Doyle had to actually become Ashbless and write the rest of his poetry from memory—leaving the wonderful paradox: if he learned the poetry in the 20th century, wrote it from memory in the 19th century, where did the actual poetry come from?

A lovely circular dilemma for the reader to enjoy. An interesting ending as well, in that most writers would probably want to bring their main character home to the 20th century and Powers chose not to do that, a detail that I consider to be more realistic if one can speak of such things in the context of time travel.

View 2 comments. Dec 24, Dan Schwent rated it really liked it Shelves: steampunk. Brendan Doyle is an expert on Samuel Coleridge and a contemporary of his, William Ashbless, hired by a crazy millionaire to take part in a trip through a hole in the river of time.

Rich clients have paid Darrow, the millionaire, a million dollars each to travel back to a Coleridge lecture in Only something goes wrong, as it does in most time travel stories Powers's writing is good without having needless descriptions.

His depiction of the early 's is really vivid. I found a few of th Brendan Doyle is an expert on Samuel Coleridge and a contemporary of his, William Ashbless, hired by a crazy millionaire to take part in a trip through a hole in the river of time.

I found a few of the plot twists obvious but that might be because Three Days to Never used similar themes. The Anubis Gates is really good as far as time travel stories go and features such diverse elements as magicians, body-swapping, ape men, two competing camps of beggars, and all kinds of other craziness that seem to be Tim Powers's bread and butter.

View all 4 comments. Jul 24, Emma rated it it was ok Shelves: fantasy , time-travel , science-fiction. Complicated, chaotic time travelling riotous caper combined with sorcery from Egypt.

There were some great ideas in here but the story as a whole was just too much. I was so relieved to get to the end.

Apr 12, Stuart rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites , fantastic-weird , time-travel , historical-fantasy. Tim Powers throws in so many disparate plot elements, grotesque villains, and non-stop action that its all a bit overwhelming, but it was an incredibly fun ride.

This time I listened to the audiobook narrated by Bronson Pinchot, also known as Balki from the inane sitcom Perfect Strangers back in the s.

He has became a well-respected voice actor and sounds nothing like that silly character. He manages to do a huge range of accents, mostly Victorian British, and the wealth of historical details of Victorian London that Powers packs into such an action-filled story is quite an impressive achievement.

Hearing so many familiar place names in London was a great pleasure. Just substitute the word "book" for "river", and it perfectly describes the experience of revisiting an old favorite book.

Sometimes I wish I could go back to that time when every book I read was a completely immersive experience, but the next best thing is to step into the river again and see what it feels like.

This was a fun book. The list I took it from has it tagged as sci-fi, which I began to doubt from, oh, about page 1.

I would definitely classify this as fantasy. In , some sorcerers perform a difficult magical spell in an attempt to bring Anubis back and wipe out all of these pesky modern religions.

There are some unexpected effects. Our main charact This was a fun book. Our main character, a man named Doyle, travels back in time from to for reasons explained in the book and accidentally gets caught up with events involving the evil sorcerers and the aforementioned unexpected events.

The story is pretty twisty, with lots of intertwined events affecting other things in a way that keeps you guessing and speculating, and with enough information provided that you can guess some of it successfully on your own while other things are a surprise.

That was one thing I particularly enjoyed about it. I also enjoyed the humor; there were several times when the book made me laugh out loud.

It never actually gets created, so how did it exist in the first place? I guess one could say that there was an original timeline, when Ashbless had never existed and then Doyle was born and went back in time for the first time.

Maybe that time, he first wrote the poem after his experience down the river. View all 3 comments.

May 29, Ryan rated it it was amazing. The Good : Where do I begin? This is such a clever, epic story. Time travel, body swapping, Dickensian London, Egyptian mythology, Romantic poets, evil wizards and an exploration of fatalism - props to Tim Powers for managing to combine all this into something that wasn't absolute crap.

Good story, good characters, great settings and ideas, and the ending was excellent. The Bad : It's a complicated mess at times which might diminish one's enjoyment.

Plus the book starts in , so I suppose the protagonist had a stupid hairdo. Jan 06, Martine rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy , historical-fiction , north-american , pseudo-nineteenth-century , science-fiction.

Ever wonder what it would be like to travel in time and be able to rewrite parts of history? In The Anubis Gates , Brendan Doyle, a professor of nineteenth-century English literature living in California, accidentally gets to try his hand at it when he is invited by a mad scientist to attend a lecture given by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in London.

Needless to say, an accident prevents Doyle from returning to his own time it always does in these books, doesn't it?

What ensues is an off-the-wall tale full of outlandish conspiracies, time travel, Doppelgangers and magic, and yes, a bit of poetry.

The evocation of nineteenth-century England isn't entirely convincing there are some glaring historic and linguistic anachronisms , and the narrative gets a bit predictable at times despite the plot being so insane , but the action is non stop, the story unfolds at a cracking pace and there are enough inventive and amusing links to actual history and literature to make even the harshest critic chuckle.

In short, it's a fun read -- not perfect, but perfectly entertaining, with some interesting ideas to ponder afterwards.

View 1 comment. Time travel, body swapping, Ancient Egyptian blood magic, lycanthropy, mutant beings in the sewers of early 19th C London, and a meeting with Coleridge.

The Powers imagination is on full throttle in this one right from the start, and it's a wild ride through the aforementioned tropes, with Powers jugging a variety of characters, plots, sub-plots and timelines in a riotously entertaining romp.

He keeps everything just Time travel, body swapping, Ancient Egyptian blood magic, lycanthropy, mutant beings in the sewers of early 19th C London, and a meeting with Coleridge.

He keeps everything just on the cusp of falling apart into incoherence, driving set piece after set piece at you until you give in, go with the flow and get carried along by the sheer manic exuberance of the thing.

It's a wonderful feat of imagination, a wonderful bit of writing and, in the Zeisling Press hardcover I've got, a wonderfully presented package all round, with an intro by Ramsey Campbel for good measure.

It's a favorite thing of mine, and one I recommend to everyone who asks what I think they should read. So, go and read it if you haven't.

It's truly magical. Jan 09, Megan Baxter rated it liked it. What a strange book. I mean, really, really strange. It's just such a weird mishmash of science fiction and fantasy and the just plain odd.

We read it in my online SF group, and there's a good question here as to whether it's even science fiction. There's time travel, which would put it under that rubric, but also ancient Egyptian magicians ooh, a new tongue twister!

And the time travel itself, now that I think about it, may not be scientific in nature. There's the suggestion that it might be What a strange book.

There's the suggestion that it might be magical as well. Note: The rest of this review has been withheld due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement.

You can read why I came to this decision here. In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook Such an incredibly cool book!

Oct 29, Sandi rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy , I never quite knew where the story was going or what was going to happen next.

Tim Powers is one of those writers who packs meaning and significance into every scene. I found myself having to backtrack several times to see if I had missed something.

In the last third of the book, there's so much body switching and name changing that I had trouble telling who was who. I really liked the challenge though, it kept me on my toes and it was unlike "The Anubis Gates" is a terrific time travel fantasy.

I really liked the challenge though, it kept me on my toes and it was unlike anything else I've ever read.

Aug 15, Jason Pettus rated it it was amazing Shelves: postmodernism , personal-favorite , alt-history , sci-fi , smart-nerdy , weird.

Genre fans will probably best know his "Fault Lines" trilogy from the s, a contemporary story about the "secret history" of magic in southern California; non-fans will probably be most familiar with a supernatural pirate novel he wrote in called On Stranger Tides , which twenty years later was adapted into the fourth "Pirates of the Caribbean" movie, to almost no one's satisfaction.

Although not his first-ever book that would be the traditional sci-fi tale The Skies Discrowned , which I'm reading next , the novel of his that I most recently took on was the first to get him a lot of attention, 's The Anubis Gates which won that year's Philip K.

Like many of his books, Anubis posits that there were a whole series of hidden supernatural things going on that explain the gaps in real history from various famous moments in time that we know of; here, for example, that the birth of Romanticism in the early s coincided with a group of Egypt-worshipping occultists who could do actual real magic, and that their unsuccessful attempt to bring back the pagan god Anubis from the dead resulted in ripping open a series of holes in the fabric of the space-time continuum.

Flash-forward to the early s, then, and we see that a Ted-Turner-type ailing billionaire has actually figured out a way to access these space-time holes, has sold a dozen private "time-traveling tickets" for millions of dollars to his rich friends to help fund his research, and has hired an academic expert on Samuel Taylor Coleridge to be essentially a "tour guide" for this group, who are traveling back to for a night to attend a lecture by this famous poet and opium addict.

Needless to say, things go to hell with this plan just as soon as they get there; and our historian hero Brendan Doyle finds himself permanently stuck in London, where he must learn to fend for himself while trying to track down a way to return to his own time, avoid the occult magicians who now know that a group from the future have traveled back to their time, and learn more about the hidden agenda that made this dying billionaire want to travel back to this specific moment in history in the first place.

Hint -- it has to do with the werewolf-like serial killer who happens to be haunting the back alleys of London's East End at this same time.

Like most of Powers' books, it's a mondo storyline that sometimes gets so weird and scattered that you can't possibly imagine how he's going to tie it all together by the end; but like most of Powers' books, he eventually does, with a kind of finesse and mastery over the three-act plot that makes most people an instant fan once they've read even a single book by him.

Powers paints a portrait of earlys London here that is so real and concrete-feeling, it seems sometimes like you have literally stepped back in time yourself; and by sticking to the real events and people of this time with the fastidiousness of an academe one of the other things his books are known for , he delivers not just a fantastical book but a historical one as well, one that looks at the actual things that were going on at that time and simply asks, "And what if a bunch of crazy supernatural things were also happening, at the moments that the historians weren't around to write about?

It'll be interesting at this point, I think, to jump back to the beginning of his career when he was writing much more straightforward genre tales; then after that, I think I'll jump forward to the "Fault Lines" books 's Last Call , 's Expiration Date and 's Earthquake Weather , and see him at what many consider the height of his power as a storyteller.

If you're never delved into the career of this fascinating writer yourself, I strongly encourage you to do so. Aug 30, thefourthvine rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Anyone who loves time travel stories the way fetishists love their kink porn.

Shelves: sff. Tim Powers is at his best with wacked-out time travel stories, and that's precisely what this is. He basically took the entire collection of English-language literary devices and tossed them into one book.

And then added some poetry. And some genderfuckery. And Ancient Egyptian myths and legends. And, also, did I mention the time travel?

A mild-mannered literature professor this is, um, something of a theme character in Powers' work goes back to the time of Lord Byron, and - look.

Things h Tim Powers is at his best with wacked-out time travel stories, and that's precisely what this is. Things happen. I'm not going to spoil it.

Suffice to say that this is the kind of book time travel fans read with joy and sorrow - joy because oh my god, so awesome , and sorrow because sooner or later the joy will be over.

The book isn't without flaws - Powers was still a fairly unseasoned writer when he produced this, and it shows.

But, seriously, whenever I re-read this, I'm having too much fun to care. Dec 28, SAM rated it did not like it Shelves: , garbage-shelf.

Next year I'll choose my books more wisely!!! Finally listened to it as a whole piece and not in odd mismatched parts from listening to it as I fall asleep.

An interesting thought experiment. A lover of history ends up thrown back in time and living in various parts of the past.

This is a complex story full of details that matter. In a way, you can't get distracted or zone out because you will definitely lose track of something important.

Powers did too good of a job of portraying the different character's feelings. It is done so well that you don't realize that you "feel" like that character while reading the story.

I had to spend more time with this book than I did a Malazan novel. May 13, Daniel Attack of the Books!

Burton rated it it was amazing Shelves: hugo , science-fiction , fantasy. But then, what should I have expected? As I think I saw someone else mention about the author, who else could combine Egyptian mythology, Lord Byron, quantum mechanics, sorcererous clowns, and time travel?

It is at times dark, other times indulgent, and occasionally syrupy with fantasy. It is, at all times, a complex mystery unfolding.

Brenden Doyle, an expert in the 19th century poet William Ashbless, is hired by a neurotic millionaire to provide the historical context for a lecture given by Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Except the lecture is to be given in , and Doyle is to deliver his pre-lecture lecture to a team of time travelers who will attend meet Coleridge in person.

Everything goes according to plan, until Doyle finds himself stranded in London, penniless, pursued by murderous cultists of ancient Egyptian gods, and unmistakably out of place in time.

Powers has a fantastic knack for writing with the kind of abandon that makes important details look like afterthoughts or excess description.

It makes the opening chapters feel almost scattered and confusing, but provides later chapters with a solid foundation. This is all the more interesting in the read because the pieces that Powers lays out for his story come from so many different directions.

Using real events as a template for the events of his The Anubis Gates, he then strings them between them with the fantastic and creative.

The world he describes is alive, colorful and bright, helped along by vivid writing that adeptly adjusts language, accent, nomenclature, and description to match the geography and historicity of his settings.

Using history as his backdrop—especially times and places so disparate—does require some leaps, though, and as the pages pass, there were moments when I wondered if Powers would get to the point, whether he would be able to tie up all of the loose ends.

So much time had been spent laying the ground work, and now the leap was going to be dramatic to pick up the pacing. He wastes no time in satisfying his reader, meeting expectations, and answering questions.

Shelves: reviewed , historical-fiction , fiction , readbooks-male-author-or-illust , speculative-fiction , z , zz-3star , novel , groups-buddies.

This book was exhausting to read. It has an extremely convoluted plot and I had to concentrate carefully to avoid feeling confused.

I suppose it earns 4 stars or even 5 for the author managing to put it all together at the end, and that was quite a feat, but my experience of reading it was just that I liked it, nothing more.

I think that too much happened and that there was too much This book was exhausting to read. I think that too much happened and that there was too much action.

The prologue was really hard for me to get through but once I got to the rest of the book I found it interesting.

I appreciated the historical fiction, especially the inclusion of some romantic poets. I liked the humor, especially one extended part toward the end.

I was thoroughly impressed and the depth of the soundstage and the ethereal layers which are omnipresent on this album, although unfortunately not as well executed.

The band's performances shine on all tracks with a particular highlight to the intriguing keyboard layers.

It's actually hard for me to believe the difference it makes when Henrik is singing softer sections as opposed to the more traditional metal vocals.

He is really on the money and we definitely hear that in the 14 minute monster 'Dream Within a Dream' and the closing track which shows a vulnerable and tender side and is both a puzzling and satisfying closure to the album.

Progressive Music in general has many a promising release scheduled for this year and 'Horizons' is no exception to the mega-hyped anticipation that many prospering bands have been seeing such as Opeth and Teramaze.

In some ways perhaps the hype had artificially raised my expectations of the release, and I have to admit I have not been the greatest follower of Anubis Gate's previous output with the exception of 'Andromeda Unchained' which I actually found to be a shining star of quality in the band's back catalogue.

Horizons has caught my attention and changed some of my disposition towards the band, however I have to admit - I have not been fully captured.

Whilst I see what many others are seeing in the band, the release does not connect me on the emotional level that I need to be completely transported to another dimension and height of auditory pleasure.

A solid effort with some moments of greatness and some that don't quite hit the mark for me. Anubis Gate is a progressive metal band that bends the rules a bit.

They don't resemble Dream Theater to my ears, and they don't succumb to showboating or endless riffing. Instead, Anubis Gate aims for something higher than what's been done in the past.

The band has a unique sound, one that deserves more attention and that would certainly thrill many metalheads, as well as prog rock fans, too.

Their sound revolves around layers of sound, of which metal is only a part. You see, on "Horizons", the band has created an album of superior dark guitars, incredible drumming and bass, beautiful keys, and powerful vocals that combine to create slick melodies, piercing electronic tones, technical expertise, and maturity beyond their years.

If I had to make comparisons, I would call this new album a cross between Circus Maximus and Subsignal. You see, the band mixes a big helping of pop into their sound, and achieves a similar sound to these two bands in that they write infectious melodies that contrast nicely to the virtuosity on display.

You read that correctlythis metal band utilizes pop quite a bit. It's in their catchy choruses, their harmonies, and their general attitude on certain songs.

That is not to say that "Horizons" is devoid of metal, though. Anubis Gate has a fresh sound to their riffing, and the structure, not the technicality, seems more calculating.

They seem to set out with a certain idea in mind, and they pull it off flawlessly, without ever becoming pretentious.

The band leans, not on metallic instrumentals, but upon genuine melodies and superior songwriting. Indeed, one of the first things I noticed on "Horizons" was the incredibly catchy songs.

And, yet, the structures are even more impressive, such as on my favorite track, "Dream Within a Dream".

This longer track mixes a catchy chorus in the first half with an ethereal, almost psychedelic interlude that leads into some fantastic metal.

You see, the band masterfully combines all their elements to the point where it all feels so organic and inspired.

Other tracks are equally impressive. And on and on the album goes, each song being fully enjoyable and supremely composed.

Never overbearing, and always interesting, unlike much prog metal today. Other favorites include "Airways" and "Breach of Faith".

They have crafted a balanced album full of truly interesting riffs, mesmerizing electronics, and catchy melodies.

It's a wonderful combination that uses all the tools in the toolbox without ever using any of them as a crutch.

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